• I've loved playing Her Story, and if you had any doubt that some of its success were more down to coincidence than writing – well, Sam Barlow's blog will prove you wrong. This, on Ballard's use of fragments, and that as a motif for storytelling is cracking. (And: lots of the readings of Her Story are coming about not just because of the quality of Barlow's work, but because non-linearity leads us to strange and exciting places; the skill is allowing the text to support that not by covering every base, but by hinting at many bases).
  • Generative imagery, derived by running neural networks backwards on photos – and then streaming it all to Twitch, using Twitch Chat for input. It's the last bit that makes it great: as I type, nearly 10,000 people have seen this psychedelic mess (and 100 are watching right now).
  • "To be honest, the kids almost felt superfluous at Diggerland. Of course it was built for them, and its infrastructure relies on their existence, but there's something too mindless about the enjoyment they were having. They couldn't quite grasp how truly ludicrous it is to have a whole theme park predicated on the entertainment value of industrial machinery. They scurried around, shouting and dribbling and tripping over things, but they weren't reading the signs above the ride entrances that tell you how much each machine costs, or what they weigh, or any of the other intriguing stats. You could see the dads sat in the diggers with their children on their laps, enjoying the quality time with their offspring, sure, but also secretly wanting their offspring to hit the road so they could be left alone to enjoy lifting piles of mud around with a giant mechanical scoop."