• "It may be a little hidden but Git actually comes with auto completion, you just have to set it up." I did not know that. Useful!
  • "The program seeks to accommodate up to 15 students who are considered "at-risk for dropping out or poor performance in core classes", focusing on themes such as literacy and writing, mathematics, 21st-Century technology skills, leadership, and more. The site argues that students who are considered "at-risk" usually haven't reached that point because they lack the capacity to learn, but because school no longer holds any relevance to them or it bores them…" …and so it uses WoW to provide them with relevant usage-examples of the subjects they need to get better at. Not entirely convinced, but interesting that they're using a wiki to collate lesson ideas/plans.
  • "In the case of European Air War, what management wanted was a very cool game to sell that customers would love. What the lead programmer did was present it to them so that they could see, clearly, that this was exactly what they had on their hands already. They, too, were having trouble digging through all those details and seeing the big picture." Lovely story about the importance of presentation on any kind of project.
  • "Being a light-hearted look at the world of story and writing in games." Written by Richard Cobbett, it's quite a lot of fun. And he's played Realms of the Haunting, too. Awesome.
  • "Red dot fever enforces a precision into your design that the rest must meet to feel coherent. There’s no room for the hereish, nowish, thenish and soonish. The ‘good enough’." Dingdingding. +5 points to Taylor, as usual. Place, not location.
  • "TinkerKit is an Arduino-compatible physical computing prototyping toolkit aimed at design professionals. The interest in physical computing as an area in development within the creative industries has been increasing rapidly. In response to this Tinker.it! is developing the TinkerKit to introduce fast iterative physical computing methodologies to newcomers, and particularly design professionals." Standardised modules, standardised connectors, Arduino-compatible. I remember Massimo showing me his keyboard-emulating board ages ago. Nice to see Tinker productising the platform, too.
  • "The buttons are designed to look very similar to basic HTML input buttons. But they can handle multiple interactions with one basic design. The buttons we’re using are imageless, and they’re created entirely using HTML and CSS, plus some JavaScript to manage the behavior." Dark, dark voodoo, but very impressive – and excellently explained by Doug Bowman. It's nice to see Doug blogging again.
  • "If 2009 is going to see the emergence of high-quality browser-based games, then 2009 is going to be the year of Unity. It has: lots of powerful features; iPhone support; Wii publishing; a developing community; quality developers using it; and an upcoming upcoming PC version. In short, it is about to make a major splash. I feel compelled to jump in with it — the indie license is cheaper than the Flash IDE."
  • "bash completion support for core Git." Ooh. This looks really, really nice.

Rob Orsini’s got a nice little shell script for opening iTerm with everything he needs for his app: a vim window or two, a dev server, the Rails console, and a final tab to tail the development logs.

Of course, I’m a TextMate man myself, and so a bit of tweaking this morning brought out my own version of it. The first tab opens the project in Textmate and puts your shell into the project root, all ready for running tests and specs (unless you’ve already caught the autotest bug); the second tab fires up Mongrel on port 3000; the third fires up the console; the fourth tails development.log . The changes in filenames/commands are mainly my personal environment, so tweak away. Hardly warrants a blogpost, really, but thought I’d share, because it’s really going to be useful in future. Requires iTerm, TextMate, and the mate command (which should be set up by default when you install TextMate).

#!/bin/sh

if [[ $# == 0 ]]; then
  PROJECT_DIR=$PWD
elif [[ $# == 1 && -d "$1" ]]; then
  PROJECT_DIR="$@"
else
  print "usage: railsterm.sh [rails project directory]"
  return 1
fi
    
osascript <<-eof
  tell application "iTerm"

    make new terminal

    tell the last terminal

      activate current session

      launch session "Default Session"

      tell the last session
          set name to "$PROJECT_DIR"
          write text "cd \"$PROJECT_DIR\""
	      write text "mate .;"
          write text "clear; ls;"
      end tell
		
      launch session "Default Session"
      tell the last session
          set name to "server"
          write text "cd \"$PROJECT_DIR\""
          write text "mongrel_rails start"
      end tell

      launch session "Default Session"
      tell the last session
          set name to "console"
          write text "cd \"$PROJECT_DIR\""
          write text "./script/console"
      end tell

      launch session "Default Session"
      tell the last session
        set name to "development log"
        write text "cd \"$PROJECT_DIR\""
        write text "cd log"
        write text "tail -f development.log"
      end tell

    end tell
  end tell
eof

Don't forget to chmod +x the file if you want to make it executable.