• "Many people hack together shell scripts quickly to do simple tasks, but these soon take on a life of their own. Unfortunately shell scripts are full of subtle effects which result in scripts failing in unusual ways. It’s possible to write scripts which minimise these problems. In this article, I explain several techniques for writing robust bash scripts." This looks really useful.
  • "I wanted it to be always on, with no dialling up required, and for it to automatically recover from network outages. I wanted the display to be big, but not intrusive. I didn't want a video conference. I didn't want people to be able to log in from home, or look back through recorded footage. I wanted to be able to wave at the folks in the other office every morning and evening, and for that feel normal." This is very good, and Tom is smart.
  • "Brogue is a Roguelike game for Mac OS X, Windows and Linux by Brian Walker." It's REALLY good: stripped-down and straightforward, as Rogue was, but with nice mouse implementation and a lovely auto-explore mode. Really rather nice.

Pulling from Git over a non-standard SSH port

13 October 2008

I must have lost about six or seven hours trying to get a Rails application deploying from Git in the past week. I could push and pull from the repository, but could I get the thing to deploy via Capistrano? No, I could not.

The problem, as far as I could tell, was not with Capistrano. It was a simple SSH problem. I block port 22 for SSH on the server in question, for security reasons, and use a different port. But, no matter how I specified it, Git was insistent on trying to pull over 22. I did a lot of Googling, and found lots of conflicting answers, none of which worked.

And then I learned my lesson. That lesson is: when Linus tells you what to do, you do it:

Use the “.ssh/config” file ;)

So I configured a hostname in .ssh/config on the server, and everything worked instantly.

A lot of problems tend to come down to SSH, it seems. After that point, everything went swimmingly.